Motor Insulation Systems (7) – Finish

Significance Of Winding Configuration and Method
Figure 6 is a representation of one (1) coil of a motor winding consisting of several turns.

The coil voltage is distributed among the turns so that the turn to turn voltage is less than the full coil voltage.

If the coil is wound concentrically, each turn of the coil is wound next to the previous turn and the coil is built up in successive layers. This ensures that each turn of the coil is in contact only with immediately preceding and successive turns, and the first turns in the coil are separated from the last turns. This means that the voltage between two (2) conductors that are next to each other is always less than the full voltage that is applied to the coil. If the coils are wound randomly, the positions of the individual turns are not controlled. With random winding, it is possible that the first turn of the coil may be in contact with the last turn. If the first turn of the coil is in contact with the last turn, two (2) layers of magnet wire insulation must withstand full coil voltage. Figure 7 shows the comparison between concentric and random winding. Most motors rated for operation at 600V or less have random windings.

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